The Session #123: Simply Cutting Through the Beer Noise

“It’s been my policy to view the Internet not as an “information highway,” but as an electronic asylum filled with babbling loonies.”

Chicago columnist Mike Royko wrote those words way back in 1996 not long before he died. If he were alive today, he’d probably say the same thing. Plenty agree with Royko, both then and now. It’s with this perspective as I consider Josh Weikert’s question of “Is the Internet helping or hurting craft beer?”.  Josh wants us to keep it simple. I’ll try.

Dipsite all the noise, the Internet is clearly helping craft beer, or breweries and beer drinkers wouldn’t use it. Everyone has their reasons. Breweries talk about connecting with customers. Beer geek swap opinions and arrange beer trades in ways that would be virtually impossible without the Internet. I have no idea how I could fully understand, appreciate and write about beer without the Internet so I’m grateful for it’s existence. The Internet dramatically reduced the cost and increased the speed in communication, so there’s no way we could be as knowledgeable about beer, or anything else, without it.

The great thing about the Internet is it gives everyone a voice.  The bad thing about the Internet is that you can hear everyone’s voice. Which means unless you have an infinite amount of time to kill on the Internet, you better develop some good filters to extract the few nuggets of good information from all the noise out there.  And if you want to get heard, you want to impose that filter on yourself and make sure when you grab the Internet mic to talk to the world, you really have something good to say. Otherwise, you’ll just get filtered out. It becomes even more important to find your unique voice, because otherwise you’re just like millions of other ones out there.

I get a lot of great information from breweries that get this.  Other breweries don’t and deliver things like breathless announcements about expanding distribution into South Dakota or a steady drumbeat of Chicken Wing Specials at the brewpub. These breweries get closed from my social media feeds pretty darn quick. Jeff Alworth had some great ideas for breweries trying to find their voice in social media.

This may be obvious, but from the looks of things on the Internet these days, it bares repeating: If you want to be heard above the rising beery noise on the Internet, you need to find a way to say something worth listening to.

Is that simple enough?