Remembering "The Postman"

I was thinking the other day about a runner I used to know. We called him “The Postman”, since his job was delivering the mail. For a while in his life, he was losing his battle with alcoholism. He hid beers in his mail sack, and would drink them on his routes. I heard rumors that he’d disappear for a few days without warning, and then call his wife in Ohio to tell her he was in a hotel in someplace like Phoenix, totally out of money, and plead with her to pick him up.

He stopped drinking and started running. On training runs, he was always smiling, always talking, and always pushing the pace. When everyone was done, he’d still put in a few more miles. He started doing ultra marathons, races over distances of 30 to 100 miles, and he’d do them almost monthly, sometimes weekly. It often takes over a month to recover from these events.

I suppose being addicted to running beats being addicted to alcohol. I don’t know if he saved his marriage, or ever had a relapse, and have lost track of him.

Where ever you are “Postman”, hope you’ve still made it.

John Urlaub: Brewery Owner, Beer Runner, Beer Cyclist

John Urlaub, the owner of Rohrbach Brewing Company in Rochester, NY, is a beer runner and beer cyclist. I stumbled upon this fact while seeking permission to use his company logo for a Session Post I wrote a little over a month ago, about a trip to his great brewpub and the beer enjoyed there. This was an embryonic time for this blog, and I wasn’t sure if the concept of “beer running” made any sense to anyone besides myself. But wouldn’t you know, John reassured me that he thought it was a good idea, since he’s a beer runner, too.

He’s also a beer cyclist, biking more than running in the summer, when the weather is more favorable for cycling. He completed a century ride a couple years ago, which he considers his best running or cycling experience, and recently rode in the Tour de Cure. Despite the fact that he runs a few times a week, John modestly asked “to please keep in mind that I am not a real long distance runner”.

If there is anything differentiating John from the “real long distance runners” I know, it’s that he talks little about his accomplishments and activities, preferring the facts to speak for themselves. He seems to have little interest to toot his own horn, or at least toot his own horn with some guy writing a blog way out in California he has only met by e-mail. I can only speculate it’s this modest, no-nonsense attitude has made him a successful brewer and business owner. And it probably helped him complete that century ride.

Get Ready Sacramento Beer Runners: Blood, Sweat and Beers is On!

On August 16th, Fleet Feet Sacramento is putting on Blood, Sweat and Beers. It’s a trail race starting and finishing at Railhead Park in Auburn, CA along the picturesque American Canyon trails. There are two courses for this race, the short course measuring 5.5 miles, while the long course consists of 9.3 trail miles. Finisher of either race course over the age of 21 earn two complimentary beers, courtesy of Sierra Nevada Brewing. The field is limited to 750 entries, which the organizers expect to fill before race day. More information and online registration can be found on the race website.

Carbo Loading with Napa Smith Lost Dog Red Ale

I’ve been to Napa Valley a couple times, and actually enjoyed the time spent there. The whole place does seem like a giant foodie amusement park full of elitist snob appeal. But believe it or not, you can actually find some places among all the glitzy wineries that aren’t about extracting lots of money from free spending tourists, but are about the wine. You can even find wine in Napa Valley which is actually worth what you pay for. The place does have some redeeming qualities.

More good news about Napa Valley is that a brewery recently opened up at the south end of the valley, in Napa. Since it’s own by the Smith family, they decided to call it Napa Smith. Who is this mysterious Smith family? Their website doesn’t say. But whoever they are, they hired legendary Don Barkley as their brew master, who has 30 years craft brewing experience, which is a long time considering many craft breweries haven’t even been in business half as long.

Last fall when in Napa, I picked up a bottle of their Pale Ale. Sorry to say, it was rather underwhelming. It seemed rather weak and watery, and just not that interesting. I was surprised, and after seeing some positive reviews of their beers, figured maybe I got a bad batch or a bad bottle. Seemed like Napa Smith was worth giving another try.

I’m glad I did. I opened up a bottle of Napa Smith Lost Dog Ale that hit me right away with a strong fruity aroma dominated by grapefruit. The flavor with more of the same, rather fruity dominated by grapefruit, although I was picking up a little apricot. It’s rather malty, but for all the malt and fruitiness, very little sweetness. There’s a little hop bitterness and a slight astringency at the end. I found this one rather smooth and fresh tasting.

I also tried Napa Smith Amber Ale, which seemed very rich and malty for the style. The malt had a slightly roasted character, without any real sweetness, and the brew had a dry finish, with very little hop presence.

Maybe I need to get to Napa more often. And they do have this nifty little marathon

The Session #29: Beer in a Land where the Gun has Long Ruled


(In this month’s Session, Will Travel for Beer, hosted by BeerByBART, we’re asked to either write about beer trip we’ve taken, or beer related things we do when travelling.)

Last March, I went with Linda to visit her home town of Las Cruces, New Mexico for a few days. Las Cruces is not far from the border towns of El Paso, Texas and Juarez, Mexico. It lies at the northern end of the large Chihuahuan Desert, which extends far south across the border deep into Mexico, and westward into Texas. I had never been to this part of the country before, but was well acquainted with recent news stories about violent drug wars, and gruesome discoveries of mass graves full of victims of these wars.

This is nothing new for this region of the country, which has a rich history of outlaws, marauding bandits, and violent clashes for well over a century. The reason for this perpetual state of violent struggle becomes apparent simply looking over the landscape. There’s almost nothing to fight for. Food, water, and good land are in precious little supply in the high desert. With the vast distances between towns and historically high levels of government corruption, guns were often used to settle disputes and keep order. Dying of natural causes was no small accomplishment in this region, where many died trying to protect what little they had, or were killed in an unsuccessful attempt to steal from someone else. Perhaps the most infamous person in these struggles was Henry McCarty.

Henry McCarty is better known as William Bonney, and even better known as Billy the Kid. He was born in an Irish slum on Manhattan Island, and his somewhat dysfunctional family continued to move westward across the country looking for better places to live until they arrived in New Mexico in 1874 when he was in his early teens. Like many young men in this time and place, he turned to a life of crime, and later joined a gang of horse thieves. Around the age of 20, he was recruited into an armed conflict between rival ranching interests, known as the Lincoln County War. Since McCarty’s side lost, the winners vilified him in sensationalistic stories, describing him as sadistic killer of over twenty innocent victims. From all personal accounts, he was actually quite literate, articulate, highly sociable, and a good dancer, who most historians believe was only responsible for a more modest number of about five killings. To the local Mexican population, he was a folk hero who fought a ranching syndicate which actively kept Mexicans near the bottom of the pecking order, and one of few whites in the region who adapted the language, customs, and dress of the local Mexican population. Eventually captured, Billy the Kid was tried and convicted of murder in a small courthouse in the New Mexico town of Mesilla, which is adjacent to Las Cruces. The court house still stands today, but is now a souvenir shop, where you can buy a postcard, T-shirt, or other trinkets with Billy the Kid’s picture on it.

About a half mile from this courthouse turned souvenir shop is the High Desert Brewery, which Linda and I visited one afternoon. Pulling into the dusty parking lot, full of beat up pick-up trucks parked on the hot asphalt, I was a little leery of what sort of clientele we might find inside. The whole low-slung adobe building looked a bit worse for wear, with the small High Desert Brewing sign a bit faded. Most small brewpubs like this one are full of locals, and I was not sure how well two out-of-towners would be received moseying into some strange brew pub.

Turns out I had nothing to worry about. Like most brewpubs all over the country, everyone was there to relax and have a good time over a good pint of beer. The bartender and a customer were chatting about the news story CNN was reporting on the small TV near the bar. Linda and I took a seat and soon our waitress appeared, who looked and acted more like a librarian than a bar waitress. She told us they don’t offer a tasting flight when we asked for one, so we opted for a “super-sized” tasting flight by sharing a few eight-once glasses of the various house beers.

As one might expect from a desert brewpub, the strongest offerings were of the lighter, thirst quenching beer styles. My favorites were their crisp Bohemian Pilsner, and an excellent Amber Lager, which had a slightly nutty and sweet malt taste and crisp grassy hops finish. All of the beers were on the light tasting side of each particular style, and the hop level was dialed down compared to typical breweries in the western United States. But despite this, the beer seemed flavorful and vibrant, not thin and watery, and I never found any of their offerings worse than “good”. As for the food, let’s just say if you like New Mexico Green Chile’s sprinkled liberally into your bar food, you’re going to be pretty happy here.

One cannot discuss High Desert Brewing without mentioning all the postcards, beer paraphernalia, and other artifacts covering the walls and ceiling. It’s all sent in and donated by various visitors and patrons, and creates a unique and organic connection between the brewpub and its customers. So many places try to manufacture this type of environment, but when you see it here, it’s very genuine. Back by the restrooms is one of the finest collections of Elvis paintings on black velvet you can find West of the Mississippi. It makes waiting your turn a great cultural experience.

The last day, Linda and I went with her parents to White Sands National Monument. On the way there, we drove past White Sands National Missile Range, a US Army base full of people who specialize and train in the art of blowing up things. White Sands National Monument is basically a vast series of white sand dunes composed of powdered gypsum. We took a couple snow disks with us, and sledded down the dunes as if they were hills covered with snow.

Travel gives me the opportunity to discover the history and geography of a place, which is often reflected in its local beer. It’s why I seek out local breweries and brewpubs wherever I travel.

Beer Running Tip : A Cure for Plantar Fasciitis is in Your Fridge

Let’s face it, injuries are often a part of running, and plantar fasciitis is particularly nasty. If you’ve had it, you know what I’m talking about. That intense pain under the heel caused by damage and inflammation of the plantar fascia ligament, a common overuse injury runners face. It’s tormented many runners, including yours truly. Because the plantar fascia ligament receives so little blood flow, the ligament takes a long time to heal, often weeks, or even months. It’s stopped or slowed many a runner in their tracks.

The good news, fellow beer runners, is that relief is no further than your fridge. Just gingerly hobble over to your refrigerator and pull out a cold bottle of beer. Sit down on a chair and slowly roll the cold bottle with your foot using gentle pressure to stretch the plantar fascia ligament, encourage blood flow, and reduce swelling. This technique also works for pains in your arches, too. It’s really a proven and recommended technique, but if you insist on consulting medical professionals, you can go here.

Bay Area Beer Runner highly recommends that you seek post-therapy refreshment with a different beer than the one you just rolled around on the floor.

Belgian Beer Pairing at BJ’s Brewhouse

This coming Tuesday, June 23rd, BJ’s Brewhouse in Cupertino will be hosting a Belgian Beer Dinner starting at 7:00 pm. BJ’s in Cupertino is located at 10690 De Anza Boulevard, close to Apple’s headquarters. Cost is $30.

BJ’s Brewhouse is a decent sized chain of beer-themed restaurants usually located in malls or large retail locations. I’ve been to a couple locations, and like most mall and big box retail establishments, the place gives off a corporate feeling and just don’t have that neighborhood vibe like a good local brewpub. But thankfully, this doesn’t carry over to the beer, which is solid. For example, I’m a fan of their Piranha Pale Ale, which has a snappy, hoppy bite to it. It isn’t the timid, safe, and afraid to offend type of brew you might expect coming from a business with roots in shopping malls. I like to support local businesses and brewers rather than the big chain stores, but BJ’s is doing a great job bringing good beer to the masses, so have to applaud them.

Here’s what they have on the menu:

Apertif
Brugse Zot (Brouwerij de Halve Maan)

Course 1
BJs Nit Wit with Thai Shrimp Lettuce Wraps

Course 2
Monk’s Cafe Flemish Sour Ale (Brouwerij Van Steenberge) with Sesame Chicken Salad

Palete Cleanser
Petrus Aged Pale (Brouwerij Bavik)

Course 3
Popperings Hommel (Brouwerij Van Eecke) with Southwestern Pizza

Course 4
Gulden Drak (Brouwerij van Steenberge) with Old-Fashioned Pot Roast

Course 5
Troubadour Obscura (Brouwerij de Musketiers) with White Chocolate Macadamia Nut Pizookie.