The Session #32: I cannot run like a Kenyan, but at least I can drink like one

For this months Session, Girl Likes Beer asks everyone to “..pick your favorite beer made east from your hometown but east enough that it is already in a different country. It can be from the closest country or from the furthest. Explain why do you like this beer. What is the coolest stereotype associated with the country the beer comes from (of course according to you)?”

For runners, “Kenyan” is an adjective to describe how distance running performances relate to world class levels. For example, “John Smith’s 10,000 meter time was so fast, it was almost Kenyan.” This started happening in the 80’s, when Kenya started regularly sending distance runners to international track meets. The rest of the world, except for Ethiopia, didn’t have a chance, and Kenyan distance runners quickly dominated the world scene. Major marathons like the Boston and New York marathon often resemble Kenyan inter-squad competitions, rather than the the international marathons that they are.

While Kenya is known for great distance running, it is barely known for beer. However, Kenya does have is a brewing history I recently learned about. Kenya Breweries was founded in the early 1920’s by two brothers, and by the 50’s, Tusker Golden Lager became their flagship beer using Kenyan grown barley. I discovered Tusker this summer, and upon learning it was from Kenya, was intrigued enough to give it a try.

And I’m here to say, Tusker satisfies this Mzungo. (Mzungo is Swahili for “white man”.) It’s a bit of a change of pace for the lagers I’m used to, very clear tasting with a light hoppy bitter crispness. Yes, there’s a little skunkiness in there, that somehow adds to the flavor complexity, rather than detracting from it. It has this tingly fizziness to it, like mineral water, and the beer has a refreshing palate cleansing mouth feel to it.

Back in the day, I dreamt about running as fast as the Kenyans, blazing across the rolling African countryside. Today, I’m content to plod around my suburban neighborhood, and knock back a couple Tuskers after a run.

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ramblingsofabeerrunner

Writing about beer from the California's Silicon Valley.

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